Tag Archives: varroa

Bee Chemotherapy – Part II

Have you noticed that whenever things don’t work out the way people want people frequently say, “Well, at least I learned a lot.”  “I learned a lot,” is a nice code phrase that lets people know that things didn’t go well at all but you are either choosing to be optimistic or you don’t want to share your problems with the world.  In Part I, I discussed how Doug and I were treating our bees with formic acid to lower the varroa mite levels.  In case you were wondering how things went with the treatment, all I can say is:  “Well, at least we learned a lot.” Continue reading

Bee Chemotherapy – Part I

All our bees are currently undergoing the beekeeping equivalent of chemotherapy.  In a previous post, I wrote about how our bees are infected with varroa mites.  (If you missed the post, you can reach it by clicking here.)  This week we treated  our eight hives with formic acid.  If you think beekeeping is all about singing sweetly to your bees while you happily collect honey, you would be wrong.  Sometimes beekeeping means you put on chemically resistant gloves and place acid inside your hives in the name of integrated pest management. Continue reading

New Year’s Resolutions for My Bees

This is the time when people reflect upon the past year and make goals for the year ahead.  Want to learn a new language, lose 20 pounds, or switch your diet to 100% raw vegetables?  Make these your New Year’s Resolutions!  Everything seems possible in late December with the New Year just around the corner and the actual hard work of achieving those resolutions still several days away.  I’m not making any personal resolutions this year, but I do have some bee resolutions that I am sharing with you.  Don’t be surprised if you see some of these topics appearing in future blog posts. Continue reading

Winter Hive Check – They Are Still Alive!

Tuesday was warm for December (46 °F/ 8 °C), so I walked to the hives to see if any bees were flying.  We went into winter with three colonies of bees: Alpha (our strongest colony with ~60,000 bees in two brood boxes), Bravo (~30,000 bees in two brood boxes), and Echo (~20,000 bees in one brood box).  Bees were flying in and out of Echo and Bravo, but Alpha showed no signs of life.  You can check out my last post to see how we got our bees ready for winter.

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Getting Bees Ready for Winter

Friends frequently ask me , “What happens to your bees in the winter?”  What happens is an epic struggle to keep the bees alive.  Some people say you aren’t a beekeeper until you get your first hive full of bees through the winter.  If you buy new bees every year because your bees from the previous year died, then you aren’t really beekeeping.  If you are a skilled beekeeper, your bees should have a better chance of survival than “the bees in the trees” also known as feral honey bees.

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